Insert contact lenses

inserting the contact lenses, or even touchdown, as it is called in the jargon is still a bit difficult, especially for Erstträger. But like so many other things just a matter of habituation.

We will show you step-by-step how it works. In the following, we will show you step by step how to use your contact lenses correctly and remove them easily. In addition, we will give you helpful tips on how to handle the contact lenses handling even with long fingernails and finally settle all the frequently asked questions.

Preparation and Hygiene
Set your contact lenses only with clean fingers. So first wash your hands thoroughly and dry with a lint-free towel. Rinse the contact lenses with a saline solution before inserting. Do not use water to rinse your contact lenses! With the help of your fingertip, remove the contact lens from the storage container (blister) or from the new packaging in the case of monthly / weekly or daytime lenses. For different eye values, always ensure that you always have the correct contact lens in the right eye use. It is best to always start with the same eye. We recommend using the contact lenses in front of a mirror.

We recommend this product to care for and clean our contact lenses. By using LD All-in-One solution, your contact lenses are effectively and reliably freed from contaminants and protein deposits and disinfected.

Part 1: Inserting the Contact Lens
Step 1: Checking the Lens Curl Place the lens on the tip of your index finger and check that it is in the correct position. By folding the contact lens between index finger and thumb you can find the correct curvature.
Right:
The lens has the shape of a bowl, so that the lens edges bulge each other.When you hold the lens between the index finger and thumb, the contact lens has a small contact surface and the lens edges are arched towards each other.
Wrong: The contact lens lays on the fingertip and is thus slipped outwards. The contact lens is then upside down. Then carefully fold the lens over to the right side. The edge of the contact lens is similar to a soup plate.
Step 2: Increase placement
areaWash your hands thoroughly and place the lens on the fingertip of the index finger. Right index finger for the right eye, left index finger for the left eye. The finger should be dry and the contact lens should be moist. With the middle finger of the left hand, pull the upper lid of the left eye upwards. The middle finger of the right hand pulls the lower part down.
Step 3:
Insert the contact lens Start with the right eye: Slowly bring the contact lens with your index finger to the eye until the contact lens touches your eye and adjusts to the curvature of your eye. Click with the eye open Eye in different directions so that the lens can find its place on the eye. When inserting you should avoid blinking. Then slowly release the upper and lower eyelids and blink carefully. If the lens does not rest properly, simply push away any air bubbles by massaging the closed eyelids.
Is the lens properly seated?
You should not feel the lens on the eye after inserting it properly. If you still feel some kind of foreign body sensation after several seconds, you should carefully remove the contact lens and check again if it has been inserted the right way round. Then simply invert the lens. Another cause may be light soiling (eyelashes, hair, etc.). In both cases, you should thoroughly clean the contact lens before re-inserting. It can also happen that you find slight defects (tears or kinks). Do not continue to use this lens as it may damage the eye. Therefore discard the contact lens and take a new one. Part 2: Remove the contact lens correctly. Also here: Only with clean hands on the eyes! Ideally, when you lose weight, follow the same sequence as when putting it on, so you will not confuse your contact lenses. And one more tip: Remove the contact lenses before you make-up.
Step 1:
Head straight outTurn your head forward and look in the mirror. With the right middle finger – if the right side is the one you start with, otherwise the left middle finger – pull the lower eyelid downwards. With the middle finger of the other hand hold the upper lid firmly.
Step 2:
Everything under control With thumb and forefinger dome you should carefully push the contact lens edges together. The air between the eye and lens thereby reduce the adhesion & thus lift the lens off the eye. Option 2: Look up and slide the contact lens with your right or left index finger into the lower (white) eye area. Grasp the contact lens with your thumb and forefinger and gently push it together. Thus, it dissolves from the eye and can be easily taken off.
Part 3:
Tips for long fingernails For very long fingernails, it can cause problems to get the contact lenses from the storage container. Hard edges and contact lenses are not compatible at all. Rather, the artificial lens must be recorded with the fingertip to stay as long as possible without scratches. Anyone who wears long, artificial fingernails and has already gotten used to them will, with a little practice, certainly also create this filigree work. Newbies with artificial nails are a little harder because the feeling in their fingertips is definitely different. Long gel nails are only a hindrance to contact lenses if you are not used to it or generally have problems with fine motor skills. Exercise also makes the master here. However, there is a technique especially for long fingernails. Here you keep the eye with one hand as usual and with the other hand you do the so-called victory sign. (Forefinger and middle finger spread to a V). You look into the palm of your hand and simply squeeze the two fingers together and take the contact lenses out of the eye. This method is also often recommended by ophthalmologists. Should you join

Part 1: Inserting the Contact Lens
Step 1: Checking the Lens Curl Place the lens on the tip of your index finger and check that it is in the correct position. By folding the contact lens between index finger and thumb you can find the correct curvature.
Right:
The lens has the shape of a bowl, so that the lens edges bulge each other.When you hold the lens between the index finger and thumb, the contact lens has a small contact surface and the lens edges are arched towards each other.
Wrong: The contact lens lays on the fingertip and is thus slipped outwards. The contact lens is then upside down. Then carefully fold the lens over to the right side. The edge of the contact lens is similar to a soup plate.
Step 2: Increase placement
areaWash your hands thoroughly and place the lens on the fingertip of the index finger. Right index finger for the right eye, left index finger for the left eye. The finger should be dry and the contact lens should be moist. With the middle finger of the left hand, pull the upper lid of the left eye upwards. The middle finger of the right hand pulls the lower part down.
Step 3:
Insert the contact lens Start with the right eye: Slowly bring the contact lens with your index finger to the eye until the contact lens touches your eye and adjusts to the curvature of your eye. Click with the eye open Eye in different directions so that the lens can find its place on the eye. When inserting you should avoid blinking. Then slowly release the upper and lower eyelids and blink carefully. If the lens does not rest properly, simply push away any air bubbles by massaging the closed eyelids.
Is the lens properly seated?
You should not feel the lens on the eye after inserting it properly. If you still feel some kind of foreign body sensation after several seconds, you should carefully remove the contact lens and check again if it has been inserted the right way round. Then simply invert the lens. Another cause may be light soiling (eyelashes, hair, etc.). In both cases, you should thoroughly clean the contact lens before re-inserting. It can also happen that you find slight defects (tears or kinks). Do not continue to use this lens as it may damage the eye. Therefore discard the contact lens and take a new one. Part 2: Remove the contact lens correctly. Also here: Only with clean hands on the eyes! Ideally, when you lose weight, follow the same sequence as when putting it on, so you will not confuse your contact lenses. And one more tip: Remove the contact lenses before you make-up.
Step 1:
Head straight outTurn your head forward and look in the mirror. With the right middle finger – if the right side is the one you start with, otherwise the left middle finger – pull the lower eyelid downwards. With the middle finger of the other hand hold the upper lid firmly.
Step 2:
Everything under control With thumb and forefinger dome you should carefully push the contact lens edges together. The air between the eye and lens thereby reduce the adhesion & thus lift the lens off the eye. Option 2: Look up and slide the contact lens with your right or left index finger into the lower (white) eye area. Grasp the contact lens with your thumb and forefinger and gently push it together. Thus, it dissolves from the eye and can be easily taken off.
Part 3:
Tips for long fingernails For very long fingernails, it can cause problems to get the contact lenses from the storage container. Hard edges and contact lenses are not compatible at all. Rather, the artificial lens must be recorded with the fingertip to stay as long as possible without scratches. Anyone who wears long, artificial fingernails and has already gotten used to them will, with a little practice, certainly also create this filigree work. Newbies with artificial nails are a little harder because the feeling in their fingertips is definitely different. Long gel nails are only a hindrance to contact lenses if you are not used to it or generally have problems with fine motor skills. Exercise also makes the master here. However, there is a technique especially for long fingernails. Here you keep the eye with one hand as usual and with the other hand you do the so-called victory sign. (Forefinger and middle finger spread to a V). You look into the palm of your hand and simply squeeze the two fingers together and take the contact lenses out of the eye. This method is also often recommended by ophthalmologists. Should you join